foryoursexualinformation:

housewifeswag:

this is more education about your vagina than you’ll receive in a US public school system so. read up! men too!

I love this infographic!

(Source: lilithdiana)

124,497 notes

iflewbikes:

Teach a class about racism… and this is what happens.

38,338 notes

Even little waves can become epic—but only in Puerto Rico.
Thanks for the photo share! Courtesy of highenoughtoseethesea:

Cam Richards, Puerto Rico
Ph: Kenny Hurtado

Even little waves can become epic—but only in Puerto Rico.

Thanks for the photo share! Courtesy of highenoughtoseethesea:

Cam Richards, Puerto Rico

Ph: Kenny Hurtado

362 notes

caribbeancivilisation:

Sans-Souci Palace, Haiti
“Henri Christophe, as he was better known, was among the key figures in the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), which resulted in Haiti becoming the first and only country in the world where slaves won and held onto their independence. A former slave himself, Christophe managed the plantation that was Milot for a time during the Revolution. After the fighting was over and independent Haiti’s first leader, Jean-Jacques Dessalines was assassinated (October 1806), Christophe returned to Milot and created a separate government from that based in Port-au-Prince. Naturally, he was soon elected as the first President of the State of Haiti, as he called it, eventually elevating himself to Henry I, King of Haiti, in 1811.

The Palace, constructed between 1810 and 1813, was known throughout the modern world at the time as The Versailles of the Caribbean. Sprawling gardens, fountains, bronzed lions, artificial springs, opulent furniture, decor and art pieces from all over the world were once literally everywhere the eye could see. The statue below, for instance, was imported from Italy for Henri’s wife, Queen Marie-Louise. There were once 15 of them scattered all about Sans-Souci…
"He wanted to show the rest of the world that the black people they knew only as slaves could achieve grand works the equal of any society."

caribbeancivilisation:

Sans-Souci Palace, Haiti

Henri Christophe, as he was better known, was among the key figures in the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), which resulted in Haiti becoming the first and only country in the world where slaves won and held onto their independence. A former slave himself, Christophe managed the plantation that was Milot for a time during the Revolution. After the fighting was over and independent Haiti’s first leader, Jean-Jacques Dessalines was assassinated (October 1806), Christophe returned to Milot and created a separate government from that based in Port-au-Prince. Naturally, he was soon elected as the first President of the State of Haiti, as he called it, eventually elevating himself to Henry I, King of Haiti, in 1811.

Up these stairs to the main entrance of Sans-Souci Palace in northern Haiti | SBPR

The Palace, constructed between 1810 and 1813, was known throughout the modern world at the time as The Versailles of the Caribbean. Sprawling gardens, fountains, bronzed lions, artificial springs, opulent furniture, decor and art pieces from all over the world were once literally everywhere the eye could see. The statue below, for instance, was imported from Italy for Henri’s wife, Queen Marie-Louise. There were once 15 of them scattered all about Sans-Souci…
One of 15 Italian statues imported by King Henri I of Haiti to adorn Sans-Souci Palace | SBPR

"He wanted to show the rest of the world that the black people they knew only as slaves could achieve grand works the equal of any society."

23 notes

As long as I’m on a horse, life is grand.

As long as I’m on a horse, life is grand.

My new sturdy steed

My new sturdy steed

shouldagonetocollege:

greyskiedeyes:

farvs:

divertingdiversions:

He is an artist, regardless of species.

Wait, is this for real? Because that’s crazy. It’s an elephant, painting. 

That’s fucking fantastic.

…dude, I can’t even draw a tree!

(Source: atiloquent)

252,817 notes


Little people helping cook, sitting on the counter. Sign of a happy kitchen. 

Little people helping cook, sitting on the counter. Sign of a happy kitchen. 

(Source: dailydoseofstuf)

2,799 notes